59. CAST OFF THREE QUARTERS: Starting formation -any wave or line. Each half of the line or wave works as a unit and moves forward around a pivot point three quarters (270). If the adjoining dancers are facing the same direction, the end dancer becomes the pivot while the other dancer moves in a semi-circle around the pivot. If the adjoining dancers are facing in opposite directions, the pivot point is the handhold between them and they move equally around that pivot point.

STYLING: If joined dancers are in opposite facing directions, the handhold should be hands-up position as in swing thru. If joined dancers are in the same facing direction, handholds are as in couples handhold position.

TIMING: 6 steps.

Jim Penrod writes:
The call Cast Off Three-Quarters is usually used in conjunction with Centers In. But the caller should use care and make sure the dancers understand the call. It is used extensively while teaching other calls. Do not teach it only after Centers In.

Perhaps now is a good time to again teach the concept of 1/4, 1/2, 3/4, full turns. Many dancers do not have the degree concept of a circle. At the same time, there are callers that do not explain that 1/4 of a circle is 90 degrees, 1/2 is 180 degrees, 3/4 is 270 degrees. In some cases this explanation will help the dancer's understanding.

There will be those callers that prefer to start teaching Cast Off (Three Quarters is the only one used Basic, MS, and Plus) from mini-waves. That being the case, put the dancers in mini-waves. If the dancers do not understand mini-waves, explain that just these two persons will be working together. Tell them that there is a large flag pole between them. their hands are tied to that pole. They are going to both walk around that pole 3/4 of a circle. If their right hands are tied to the pole, have them to look at the wall over their LEFT shoulder. That is the wall they will be looking at when they finish. If left hands, then look over the RIGHT shoulder. Some callers tell the dancers that it takes about three normal steps.

When teaching Cast Off with dancers facing the same direction, it extremely important to teach (train) the dancers that the end person of the twosome is the pivot person. In other words, the center person must make the outside circle. This is in direct contract to Wheel and Deal that they have been used to doing. Another difference. If both are facing the same direction then they must look over their RIGHT shoulder to see the finishing wall. This is different than in a mini-wave.

Cast Off to the caller seems to be easy. But to the dancer it is not because of the circle concept.

Heads Star Thru
Pass Thru
Circle To A Line
Pass Thru
Wheel & Deal
Double Pass Thru
Centers In
Cast Off 3/4
Star Thru
(centers) Pass Thru
Swing
Promenade

Heads Star Thru
Pass Thru
Star Thru
Pass The Ocean
Boys Run
Cast Off 3/4
Touch 1/4
Boys Run
Trade By
Swing
Promenade

(it seems like a lot of adjustment is needed after the cast off 3/4.)

Bill Horst writes:
Here's a singing call that I use with cast off 3/4

Heads (sides) lead right
All veer left
Girls trade
Ferris wheel
Double pass thru
Centers In
Cast off 3/4
Star thru
Centers square thru 3
Allemande left
Swing

Dick Mazziotti writes:
It is kind of neat to know that the very popular singing call figure mess around [Ed. note see below for def.], mess around, mess around - to a zero box. Then touch 1/4, scoot back and swing or, if very daring, scoot back twice and swing, can be turned into some moderately interesting variations. Anytime the dancers are in a position to scoot back and swing corner (do I have to say "normal position") you can add variety by doing a hinge and scoot back, or scoot back and hinge and scoot back, or cast off 3/4, scoot back and swing, etc. ad nauseam. Since the hinge and cast off from ocean waves always make new ocean waves (parallel in all cases) scoot back can be attached each time, and it presents new people with whom to do it.

Collen Brown writes:
Here's one I like
{H}[sides] star thru
double pass thru
put centers in - c/o 3/4
{all} star thru
double pass thru
put centers in c/o 3/4
{c} sq. thru 4
{ends} slide thru
swing/prom

Dick Mazziotti writes:
"Mess around" is a technical term for callers from the East. It means call whatever you like, that the dancers can do, until you get to the zero box position so you are close to a "swing your corner" It's akin to the call I teach my plus classses: Mingle.

I call it when the dancers go down the toilet, and keep trying to catch up instead of forming facing lines. Often a much used call.